History

Grounds

Grounds


The Dunsmuir mansion, designed by San Francisco architect, J. Eugene Freeman, is an example of Neoclassical-Revival architecture popular in the late 1800s. The 37-room mansion features a Tiffany-style dome, wood paneled public rooms, 10 fireplaces and inlaid parquet floors within its 16,224 square feet. Servants’ quarters in the house are designed to accommodate 12 live-in staff.

Golden Gate Park’s landscape architect, John McLaren, is said to have assisted the Hellman’s in designing the Dunsmuir gardens. A wide variety of trees, including Camperdown Elms, Bunya-Bunya and Hornbeam, still grace the estate’s gardens and expansive meadows. In addition, the Hellman estate contained: a golf course, formal croquet court, and tennis court, swimming pool with Mission-style bathhouse, glass conservatory with grotto, an elaborate aviary, formal garden maze, and Japanese garden.



The Dinkelspiel House

The Dinkelspiel House

Built in 1930 for Florence Hellman and her husband, Lloyd Dinkelspiel, this quaint cottage was a wedding gift from Mr. W. Hellman to his daughter.
The Garden Pavilion

The Garden Pavilion

Sequestered on a wooded hillside overlooking the South Pond and Gazebo area, the Garden Pavilion . This unique facility (built on the site of the original tennis court) was constructed in 1999 as part of the Centenary Celebration and preservation project of the Estate.
The Carriage House

The Carriage House

Located near the Covington Gate, the Carriage House houses a rustic mahogany-paneled great room, carriage room and stall that encourage planning and design creativity. Hay-drop openings on the first floor to the ground floor have been preserved.
The Dunsmuir Mansion

The Dunsmuir Mansion

The Dunsmuir mansion, designed by San Francisco architect, J. Eugene Freeman, is an example of Neoclassical-Revival architecture popular in the late 1800s. The Edwardian mansion — built 114 years ago host 37-rooms, features a Tiffany-style dome, wood paneled public rooms, 10 fireplaces and inlaid parquet floors within its 16,224 square feet. Servant quarters in the house are designed to accommodate 12 live-in staff.
The Meadow

The Meadow

The Expansive meadow reminiscent of English Country Estate provides a tranquil setting for friends and family recreation. It was the temporary respite campsite location for upper-class San Francisco residents during the 1906 earthquake.